Remembering My Heart

A Retreat for the Recollection of What is Important

39.fpx&obj=iip,1.0&wid=318&hei=400&rgn=0.375,0.125,0.25000000,0.25000000&lng=en_US&cvt=jpeg.jpeg

Retreat practice is the life blood of the wisdom tradition.  In retreat that we have the chance to connect with ourselves beneath the habitual patterns that we have mistaken to be ‘me’. As Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche used to say, "Samsara is mind turned outwardly, lost in its projections; nirvana is mind turned inwardly, recognizing its nature."

When to do retreat - Retreat can be done at any time for 1/2 day, a full day, a weekend, or longer.  It’s best to start with a day, or two, and work from there.  We’re encouraged to make retreat practice a regular part of our lives.  This could be as simple as closing the door to our bedroom and practicing for a Sundaymorning every month or, it could mean going to a retreat place for a week or more.
How to do retreat - There are many kinds of retreat; individual retreat, group retreat, and teaching retreat.  The most effective retreat is done alone, cut off from the concerns and distractions of our daily life.

How do I do a retreat - The ‘Remembering My Heart Retreat’ is a guide for a one, or two, day long retreat. There are certainly Buddhist elements in this format, but they can be changed in any way that is comfortable for you.  This is meant to be a guideline, and not a fixed prescription.  The guidebook is available at the Buddhist Center, or by contacting Tim.

How to start - It’s best to talk about your plans with Tim, or a friend who has experience with retreat.  They can help you plan the pace, and content of the retreat itself.

What will I need - You’ll want to have:

  • The ‘Remembering My Heart’ retreat handbook
  • The blue covered ‘Daily Liturgy’ handbook from the center
  • The practice handbook for A Treasury of Blessings, A Sadhana of the Buddha (You are encouraged to practice this during the retreat.  If you’re unfamiliar with it, but would like to practice it, ask Tim.)

You might want to take a dharma book that you find inspiring, such as one of the following:

  • As It Is        Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche
  • Rainbow Painting        Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche
  • The Way of the Bodhisattva      Shantideva
  • Counsels from my HeartH.H. Dudjom Rinpoche
  • Carefree DignityTsoknyi Rinpoche

You could also take one of the following ‘life stories’:

  • The Rain of Wisdom
  • The Life of Milarepa
  • The One Hundred Thousand Songs of Milarepa
  • The Life of Shabkar
  • Journey to EnlightenmentH.H. Khyentse Rinpoche

 


In a remote place, where the thought of death pierces the heart
The retreatant, who has profoundly turned away from attachment
Draws the boundary, giving up all concerns for this life
Hence, his mind is not involved with the eight worldly dharmas
— Kharak Gomchung